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Author Topic: resting period  (Read 11387 times)
Genevieve
« on: 2003-01-05 12:35 AM »

I can't really explain this....and I used to know the answer, but That was 4 years ago, but does anybody know what its called or what command to use on Noteworthy to put in those rest things that looks like a stretched whole rest and it has the number 4 above it??
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John Kavanagh
« Reply #1 on: 2003-01-05 01:02 AM »

I do it (and so do most people, I think) by adding [4] as a text addition, with Boxmarks as one of the user fonts. If you don't have Boxmarks, you can download it from the Scriptorium. I like it centred on the staff, which is position -1. Click "preserve width".
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David Palmquist
Virtuoso


« Reply #2 on: 2003-01-05 05:04 AM »

To preserve your bar count, if that's important to you, make sure to insert the whole rests and bar lines, then set them to never visible.  Then insert the text that John indicates.
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Carl Bangs
Dormant Virtuoso


« Reply #3 on: 2003-01-05 05:30 AM »

When you are printing parts, the hidden rests can be a shorter value to conserve space.
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Carl Bangs
Fenwick Parva Press
Registered user since 1995
Warren Porter
Virtuoso


« Reply #4 on: 2003-01-05 09:28 AM »

You might want to look at https://www.noteworthysoftware.com/forum/?topic=2316 if you are getting ready to print parts.
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Since 1998
Robert A.
« Reply #5 on: 2003-01-05 10:44 AM »

To answer Genevieve's question directly: NWC 1.75 does not have the capability to automatically insert multi-bar rests. Instead, the user inserts symbols, as text items, from a user font (such as boxmark2). To keep the measures aligned, insert invisible/muted "real" notes and barlines where needed.
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Carl Bangs
Dormant Virtuoso


« Reply #6 on: 2003-01-05 06:00 PM »

Does anyone know what the name of this repeat sign is? I can't find it in any of my reference books.
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Carl Bangs
Fenwick Parva Press
Registered user since 1995
Gloria (in excelsis) Deo
« Reply #7 on: 2003-01-05 10:51 PM »

When you are printing parts, the hidden rests can be a shorter value to conserve space.
In my experience, the duration of the rest makes no difference once hidden.  The one exception is grace rests, which take up much less space.
Does anyone know what the name of this repeat sign is?
To which repeat sign are you referring? (I don't see mention of a repeat sign in this thread.  Now watch someone point out its exact location...)
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Carl Bangs
Dormant Virtuoso


« Reply #8 on: 2003-01-07 03:44 AM »

Sorry, You are right that this thread was not about the measure repeat sign. The sign with the slanted lign and dots on each side is what I meant, and my question belongs elsewhere.
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Carl Bangs
Fenwick Parva Press
Registered user since 1995
A Registered User
« Reply #9 on: 2003-01-07 04:35 PM »

I know the sort of thing you mean, it crops up in my hymn book on a few hymns where a few words are repeated at the end of a chorus, and this symbol is shown in the music to indicate that the words are repeating (but normally the harmonization or even the tune change for each repeat).

Depending on which font you have on your PC you could do a text insertion based on italicised colons and forward slash, like so:

:/:

Sorry, can't make it work in the forum but it would work in the main NWC editing window, I'm sure.

ARU
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David Palmquist
Virtuoso


« Reply #10 on: 2003-01-09 12:13 AM »

I think you're talking about the single bar repeat sign (repeat preceding measure) and maybe the double bar repeat sign (repeat two preceding measures)too.

The single bar repeat sign resembles a percent sign and is available in Boxmarks user font, which you can download from the scriptorium and install as a font.  Set your NWC page setup font tab to include whichever userfont you wish to Boxmarks.  The symbol you want is typed by pressing the shift-5 (the percent sign) and selecting the userfont that is Boxmarks.

Noteworthy sadly does not have the two bar repeat.  Maybe one day.
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Carl Bangs
Dormant Virtuoso


« Reply #11 on: 2003-01-09 05:10 PM »

But does the single bar repeat sign have a name?
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Carl Bangs
Fenwick Parva Press
Registered user since 1995
Gloria (in excelsis) Deo
« Reply #12 on: 2003-01-09 10:30 PM »

But does the single bar repeat sign have a name?
It is referred to as the one-measure repeat (sign).
- The Essential Dictionary of Music Notation, Tom Gerou & Linda Lusk, MCMXCVI by Alfred Publishing Co., Inc. (p243).
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Carl Bangs
Dormant Virtuoso


« Reply #13 on: 2003-01-10 09:04 PM »

Gloria

That is still not a name. If the symbol truly has no name, perhaps we should give it one. I suggest "Fred" as in Fred Nacheinmalbar.
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Carl Bangs
Fenwick Parva Press
Registered user since 1995
Fred Nachbaur
Dormant Virtuoso
« Reply #14 on: 2003-01-10 11:56 PM »

LOL! Good one, Carl. But it would work better spelled "Nocheinmalbar."
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Gloria (in excelsis) Deo
« Reply #15 on: 2003-01-11 07:52 PM »

That is still not a name.
Well, that's what it's called.  What are you looking for?  Do you want it to be called something like The Lupsis or The Uukwan?  Some names are purely descriptive and not artistic.  That's life.
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Cyril N. Alberga
« Reply #16 on: 2003-01-11 09:32 PM »

I know, its OT, but I need all the laughs I can get.  Besides it IS about music.

"You are sad," the Knight said in an anxious tone: "let me sing you a song to comfort you."

"Is it very long?" Alice asked, for she had heard a good deal of poetry that day.

"It's long," said the Knight, "but's it's very, very beautiful. Everybody that hears me sing it--either it brings the tears into their eyes, or else----"

"Or else what?" said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause.

"Or else it doesn't, you know. The name of the song is called 'Haddocks' Eyes.'"

"Oh, that's the name of the song, is it?" Alice said, trying to feel interested.

"No, you don't understand," the Knight said, looking a little vexed. "That's what the name is called. The name really is 'The Aged Aged Man.' "

"Then I ought to have said 'That's what the song is called'?" Alice corrected herself.

"No, you oughtn't: that's quite another thing! The song is called 'Ways and Means': but that's only what it's called, you know!"

"Well, what is the song, then?" said Alice, who was by this time completely bewildered.

"I was coming to that," the Knight said. "The song really is 'A-sitting On A Gate': and the tune's my own invention."

--the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, aka Lewis Carroll
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Fred Nachbaur
Dormant Virtuoso
« Reply #17 on: 2003-01-11 10:57 PM »

and the tune's my own invention.

And the tune is called, of course, "Nocheinmalbar."

But that's not its name.
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Robin Withey
« Reply #18 on: 2003-01-12 05:31 AM »

Good old Lewis Carroll - he can always be relied on to complicate the simplest of statements! That's what comes of allowing a mathematician to write literature!

Robin
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